Using screencasting for student feedback

Asian woman sitting at a desk in her home looking at a laptop

Here is a scenario that I am sure most of you have experienced in your teaching career:

Sam is one of your students in your course and is having some issues with one of the assignments. He sends you an email asking for help. You respond with what you think is a detailed answer. Sam responds and asks more questions. You then respond again spending more time and energy typing another detailed answer. Unfortunately, Sam emails again still not understanding what he is supposed to do for the lesson.

Now let’s look at this scenario again but add something you may not have thought of doing:

Sam is one of your students in your course and is having some issues with one of the assignments. He sends you an email asking for help. You do a short video and audio of using your computer screen detailing and showing Sam what he is supposed to for the lesson. Sam responds and tells you that he is all set and understands what to do for the assignment.

In the second scenario, by providing the video to the student, he can quickly see and understand the assignment. These short videos are called Screencasting. According to document from Educause’s 7 things you should know about Screencasting, the definition of screencasting is “a screen capture of actions on a user’s computer screen, typically with accompanying audio…” The above scenario where student is asking a question via email provides just one example of how screencasting can be an effective learning and communication tool. It does not matter if the course is online, face to face, or blended because students will always send you questions.

In other situations, using screencasting for reviewing students’ work can be very powerful. As a personal example, I teach a Web Design class. My students need to complete several activities each chapter where they are building a website using HTML and Cascading Style Sheets. Each chapter builds on the previous, so it is important for my students to master each chapters’ concepts. I have a rubric that I use to grade the student’s work but, in some cases, doing a screencast to point out the issues with the student’s work is much more effective. In following video that is 2:32 minutes long (https://youtu.be/QNMAfiXComs) I can show and explain to the student what is wrong with their web page and show what it should correct. This is much more effective than typing up a long email.

Screencasting Software

You will need screencasting software in order to create them. In this section, I will outline a paid and free version of screencasting software.

SnagIt from TechSmith

Snagit is the best option for screencasting if you willing to pay a little bit. The education price for Snagit is $29.95 and worth every dime. Snagit not only will do screencasting but you will also be able to capture images on your computer. Please watch the short video about Snagit. I captured this video from the TechSmith site and used my computer audio to capture the sound. I highly recommend spending the money for this software.

Screen-o-Matic

Screen-0-Matic is a free screencasting software. There are some restrictions on the length of the videos which are limited to 15 minutes maximum. This should not be a problem when doing short screencasting videos. Plus, there is a branded logo from the company on all their free screencasts. Again, this may be an issue. Here is a quick example of a Screen-o-Matic video.

Screencasting can be a very powerful way of communicating with your students. An important benefit of screencasting for students is the ability to watch the video as many times as they wish. Students can also stop and watch portions of the video. It is very worth your time and energy to explore the world of screencasting.

About the author:
Alan Shapiro

Alan Shapiro

Before joining Pearson, Alan Shapiro worked at St. Petersburg College as an instructional designer for 18 years. He is also an adjunct teacher. He has been a faculty advisor for five years and has used MyLab IT for over seven years.

 

 

 


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