Revel Marketing Dixie State University

EDUCATOR STUDY

Revel marketing educator study measures exam performance between Revel users and non-users at Dixie State University

Key Findings

  • Students using Revel earned average exam scores six percentage points higher than students using only a traditional print textbook, and the difference is statistically significant.
  • 86% of students using Revel earned an A or B average exam grade, compared to 63% of students using a traditional print textbook.
  • 94% of respondents on an end-of-semester survey agreed that reading the chapter and completing the Revel quizzes prior to lecture helped prepare them to participate in class.

School name
Dixie State University, St. George, UT

Course name
Marketing Principles

Course format
Face to face

Course materials
Revel Marketing by Solomon, Marshall, and Stuart

Timeframe
Spring 2018

Educator
Donald Fisher, Lecturer

Results reported by
Candace Cooney, Pearson Customer Outcomes Analytics Manager

Setting

  • Locale: large, urban, four-year, public university in southwest Utah
  • Enrollment: approximately 9,000 students
  • Full-time retention rate: 53%
  • Five-year graduation rate: 35%
  • Ethnicity: 76% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic, 2% African American, 1% Asian, 10% Other

About the Course

Don Fisher has been teaching for 10 years and approximately seven years at Dixie State University. Marketing Principles is a one-semester, three-credit, entry-level course enrolling nearly 250 students per year, and is required of all business majors. The purpose of the course is to provide a basic background in the broad field of marketing. It examines the processes that direct the planning and execution of the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that will satisfy individual and organizational objectives.

Challenges and Goals

Fisher believes students should be responsible for their own learning, which includes reading the textbook prior to lecture, attending class prepared to participate, and contributing to class discussions. Seeking a potential course solution, he engaged in a class test of Revel™ in Spring 2018, teaching one section of his Marketing Principles class using Revel and one section using a traditional print textbook. Revel was piloted to hold students accountable for reading and understanding basic course concepts prior to attending class, so lecture could be activity-based and focus on real-world application of the content. 

As a fully digital program, Revel presents an affordable option to print textbooks, although students always have the option to purchase a print book as a companion for the online learning experience in Revel. Most students, however, choose to only purchase access to Revel. On an end-of-semester survey of Fisher’s students (57% response rate), 94% (15 of 16 students) chose not to purchase a print textbook to accompany Revel. Students who used only Revel in digital format indicated the following:

  • Initially, 63% (10 of 16 students) were apprehensive at the beginning of the semester using only Revel for reading assignments.
  • However, 90% of those students (9 of 10 students) agreed that they became comfortable using Revel for their reading assignments as the semester progressed.
  • Ultimately, 94% (15 out of 16 students) were comfortable using Revel for reading assignments either before the semester began or as the semester progressed.

Implementation

Students use Revel for understanding content and quizzing. Fisher anticipates that his students will spend approximately 1–2 hours per week reading and completing assignments in Revel. On the student survey, 63% of respondents said they spent 1–2 hours per week working in Revel, 18.5% spent 2–3 hours working in Revel, and 18.5% spent more than three hours each week working in Revel. Fisher views the Revel assignments as formative, an opportunity for students to experiment and learn, with chapter reading and quizzing taking place prior to lecture.

Revel integrates dynamic media like videos, animations, and interactive graphing throughout the pre-built readings, so students take an active role in their reading, as well as offering an alternative way of learning. These interactives are intended to be completed quickly, and they provide a different, engaging opportunity for readers: 50% of respondents on the survey indicated that they usually or always viewed the embedded media options as they were reading, while another 38% responded that they sometimes viewed the media.

This unique Revel approach of reading and engaging with chapter content, followed by immediate assessment, was widely seen as beneficial by survey respondents:

  • 88% agreed that the “read a little, do a little” interactive approach of Revel helped them learn and retain the material better than they would have with a traditional print textbook.
  • 87% said they preferred the interactivity of Revel to a traditional print textbook.

Revel offers a mobile app so students can read, practice, and study anytime and anywhere, allowing them to access course materials, including the full text, on their tablet or mobile phone, offline and online. While most students used a laptop for Revel, 44% of respondents on the survey did use their mobile phone or tablet to access Revel throughout the semester.

Revel assignments

Practice quizzes: These six-question, pre-built quizzes are located after each section and students have multiple attempts at completion. 100% of respondents on the student survey agreed that Revel Practice questions allowed them to check their understanding of material they read before moving on to the next section of the eText.

Concept Checks: These questions are embedded in the narrative of the chapter so students can confirm their understanding of the content before moving on to a new section or topic. These required assessments are comprised of multiple-choice questions and students have multiple attempts at completion. Said one student on the end-of-semester survey, I was able to take quizzes online after reading and other assignments to better understand things.”

End-of-chapter quizzes: These 10-question, multiple-choice quizzes give students an opportunity to test their comprehension of the chapter as a whole, and students have just one attempt at completion. Said one student on the end-of-semester survey, I liked the quiz questions and the chapter reviews the most. These two components helped me to understand the key terms and helped me prepare for tests.”

Other course assessments

Students complete five exams comprised of two parts: one or two-page case studies, where students relate the chapter concepts to a real business by responding to 10 multiple-choice questions, and 10–12 multiple-choice and true-false questions per chapter. Exams are open book and students have 90 minutes for completion. Additionally, a discussion board on Canvas is used to help students identify and understand scholarly information and responses, based on chapter concepts and a real world application of that material.

A marketing project, including a 15–20 page written paper and oral Shark Tank-type presentation to authentic industry consultants, is the main course assignment. Essentially, students create a new product, develop a marketing plan with SWOT analysis, and present their concept to the team. Over the last five years, six students have received a patent for their product.

Assessments

  • 40% Marketing plan project
  • 25% Exams (5)
  • 15% Discussion board
  • 10% Revel assignments
  • 10% Attendance

Results and Data

Fisher conducted a Revel class test and comparison by having one section of his course use Revel and another section use a traditional print textbook, uncertain of how this might impact exam scores. In Spring 2018, data indicate that students in the section using Revel earned average exam scores six percentage points higher than students in the section using the print textbook (figure 1). Based on a t-test, this difference is statistically significant where t(56)=-2.95 and p-value <.01.

Comparison of average exam scores in section using print textbook only vs. section using Revel

Figure 1. Average Exam Score for Section Using Print Textbook (n=32) Compared to Section Using Revel (n=28), Spring 2018 

Average exam letter grades were also compared between the two class test sections, and results are shown in figure 2.

  • 86% of students using Revel earned an A or B exam average.
  • 0% of students using Revel earned a failing exam average.

Average exam letter grades in section using print textbook only vs. section using Revel

Figure 2. Average Exam Letter Grades for Section Using Print Textbook Only (n=32) Compared to Section Using Revel (n=28), Spring 2018

The Student Experience

Responses from the Spring 2018 end-of-semester survey of Fisher’s students indicate that the majority of responding students recognize the value of Revel.

  • 88% of respondents agreed that the “read a little, do a little” interactive approach of Revel helped them learn and retain the material better than they would have with a traditional print textbook.
  • 100% of respondents agreed that Revel Practice questions allowed them to check their understanding of material they read before moving on to the next section of the eText.
  • 87% of respondents said they prefer the interactivity of Revel to a regular print textbook.
  • 94% of respondents agreed that the resources provided in Revel made the program a good value for this course.
  • 81% of respondents agreed that they would recommend Revel to another student.

Student responses to the question, “What were the benefits of Revel?” include:

  • “Revel really kept me on top of reading the material each week, and not falling behind.”
  • “I loved how interactive Revel was. I really liked how I could access the text on my computer and my phone. The app on my phone was really easy to use and do the assignments on.”
  • “I like the study road map. That helped out because it has a link to where the vocab word is. The homework questions were relevant and helped my knowledge. The case studies were good as well.”
  • “The benefits of Revel were not needing to carry the textbook around and having instantaneous access from multiple devices.”

Conclusion

Fisher engaged in this Revel class test hoping to achieve his goal of holding students accountable for their own learning, which includes being prepared by reading the textbook prior to lecture, participating during class, and contributing to class discussions. The pilot appears successful — students in the Revel section clearly indicated a preference for the interactivity of Revel when compared to a traditional print textbook and found the integrated study questions and resources very effective. Additionally, data show that exam scores were higher in the section using Revel.

Fisher cautions, though, that there was an unanticipated learning curve for students at the beginning of the semester. He recommends sharing information about the 14-day temporary access on the first day of class to mitigate some initial bumps.