Online proctoring just got easier!

Online faculty often require their students to take proctored tests to help safeguard the academic integrity of their courses. Research has shown that students regularly cheat in courses they do not value, which are usually fact-based courses such as math and science (Anderman, 2017; Trenholm, 2008).

In a position paper published in 2012, the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges recommended that instructors of online math courses require students to take at least two proctored exams that constituted a minimum of 50% of students’ course averages. The idea was for at least half of students’ course grades to be based on assessments that students were observed completing.  While a review of the literature on academic integrity and the propensity for cheating in online classes is beyond the scope of this article, it suffices to say that proctored testing is an important issue and a key requirement for many online faculty.

Arranging for online students to take proctored tests can be a tedious process. Students unable to take tests on campus with their instructors due to time or location must work with their instructors to identify acceptable alternative locations. Furthermore, instructors must send their test information to each approved proctor so that students can be given supervised access to their tests.

For instructors teaching multiple online classes with multiple students in each class needing testing accommodations, the logistics and the preparation of forms can be quite time consuming.  However, a new and very easy option for proctoring is now available for instructors using MyLab!

Pearson recently entered into a partnership with ProctorU, a well-known provider of online test proctoring since 2008. Once an institution secures a contract with ProctorU, instructors are given an institutional key which they use to enable the ProctorU feature in their MyLab courses; this is similar to how the Lockdown Browser works.

Once enabled, ProctorU can be required for selected tests or quizzes.  The process for students could not be simpler; students log into their MyLab courses and access their tests or quizzes as they normally would. When students press the Start Test button for a test with ProctorU enabled, a window pops up that walks students through the steps to start their proctored test experience.

After completing the multifaceted identity verification process that includes biometric keystroke analysis, facial recognition, and challenge questions (www.proctoru.com), students are monitored virtually by their webcam, microphone, and ProctorU software. Both the students and their computer screens are recorded while taking the test, and any questionable activity is flagged so it can be reviewed by the instructor either in real time or after the test has been taken.

This “auto proctoring,” which uses artificial intelligence to identify and flag suspicious behavior, has a one-time cost per course that is significantly lower than what students would pay for live proctoring of a single test at a physical location.  In addition to its low cost, the ProctorU integration with MyLab allows students to schedule their tests for any day and time. So instructors using MyLab can now easily incorporate proctored assessments into their courses without compromising convenience for their online students.

About the author:
Dr. Calandra Davis

Dr. Calandra Davis

Dr. Calandra Davis was a full-time college mathematics professor before joining Pearson. During the latter part of her 16 years at Georgia Perimeter College, Calandra taught and developed online courses and also served as department chair of their online mathematics and computer science department.

She then supported mathematics students in the competency-based programs at Western Governors University before joining Pearson in 2015.  Calandra now supports faculty in their implementation of MyLab Math and Statistics in her current role as a Customer Success Specialist. Calandra resides in Augusta, Georgia.


 

Sources:

Anderman, E.M. & Won, S. (2017) Academic cheating in disliked classes. Ethics & Behavior, 29(1), pp. 1–22. Doi: 10.1080/10508422.2017.1373648

Trenholm, S. (2007). A review of cheating in fully asynchronous online courses: A math or fact-based course perspective. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 35(3), pp. 281–300. Doi: https://doi.org/10.2190/Y78L-H21X-241N-7Q02