English Webinars

Pearson’s English webinars offer professional development opportunities for educators. Learn more about the sessions below and read about the speakers on our Humanities, Social Sciences, Language, and English page.

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Educators who participate in a live webinar will have the opportunity to earn Acclaim professional development badgesLearn more about digital badges.

On-Demand

Pedagogy and Practice

Teaching for Transfer: Teaching Reflection as a Habit of Mind

Professor Charles Paine, University of New Mexico

When we “teach for transfer,” we view college writing courses not as destinations but as waypoints students occupy during their time with us as they venture toward other goals – succeeding as writers and thinkers in their subsequent college courses, their careers, and lives as citizens. In this webinar, Professor Paine will summarize the principles and methods developed in writing studies scholarship to promote transfer of knowledge: asking students to write in a variety of genres and mediums and making reflection (or metacognition) central to the course from day one. Students struggle with reflection because metacognition is not “natural” — it needs to be taught and practiced. They struggle also because the “reflection genre” (as Kathleen Blake Yancey calls it) is unfamiliar to them. We can help them understand how to reflect successfully by teaching reflection as a more familiar pattern, as a narrative (much like a memoir or literacy narrative) in which they identify the rhetorical choices they have faced (the narrative “conflict”), the decisions they made, and why them made those decisions.

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Innovations in Teaching

Rhetorical Multiplicity: Making Savvy Choices in Mixing Media

Professor Anne Frances Wysocki, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

We teach about writing with words, and we can teach about color, typography, sound, and moving pictures — but how do we teach about their combined effects when they are all in one text together? How do we help students understand that type, color, words, sounds, and pictures — when placed into one text — have to be chosen in relation to each other? This presentation offers a rhetorical approach for understanding the effects of different modes playing off each other; this presentation will show you how to help students smartly shape individual modes in a text so that they play well rhetorically with the text’s other modes.

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Course Curriculum

Integrating Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking for Success in College

Professor Kim Flachmann, California State University, Bakersfield

Critical reading, writing, and thinking are the heart and soul of college success because they are the foundation of academic literacy. In this session, faculty will learn how to teach critical reading and writing through a variety of interactive activities that they can use as soon as they return to their classes. In the process, they will discover effective ways of making critical thinking a viable part of each class they teach.

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Student Engagement Badge

Achieving Aha!

Professor D.J. Henry

“Aha—used when something is suddenly seen, found, or understood.” –Merriam-Webster’s Learner’s Dictionary. Learning becomes exciting and personal at the moment “aha” occurs. Students become excited when they suddenly see and understand a concept. Once students find that they can break through long-standing confusion or apathy, they take ownership of their learning. This webinar focuses on the environment, strategies, and hands-on learning activities that foster aha moments for student readers and writers.

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Pedagogy and Practice Badge

Teaching with the New MLA Handbook

Professor Anne Frances Wysocki, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

The new MLA Handbook has been completely revamped. Centered on principles, the 8th edition brings a simplified approach to documentation and citations.With the renewed emphasis on critical thinking in education and the proliferation of different sources of content, the handbook revision is more focused on using reason and a three‑step process for creating citations. Join educator and composition handbook author Anne Frances Wysocki as she discusses how these changes will be reflected in teaching materials, as well as the implications for teaching the new pedagogy in your course.

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Innovations in Teaching Badge

Picture This! How Visual Rhetoric Augments Reading and Writing

Professor Sue Hum, University of Texas–San Antonio

Many believe that we are preparing students to read and write in a world that may not yet exist, using technologies that have yet to be invented, developing skills that surpass today’s pedagogical approaches. This future requires of educators an expanded approach to effective communication if they hope to cultivate in their students a creative, intellectual flexibility. Visual rhetoric, or the use of images in combination with words to persuade, can offer effective strategies for understanding, reflecting, and influencing. These strategies, harnessed in reading and writing pedagogy, may offer today’s students the flexible mindset necessary to thrive and succeed in the future.

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Technology and Teaching Badge

How To Get Papers From Students That Don’t Suck

Professor Christine Hein, Colorado Mesa University

Scared to read your composition students’ first drafts? What if you had the opportunity to read a first draft that resembled a revised draft or even final draft? Imagine what you would do with you all of your free time that was previously spent reading something that only resembled writing… I’m reading better first drafts, shouldn’t you be doing the same?

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Pearson_LMU_coursedesign

An Academic-Content Based Approach to Teaching Reading and Writing as Integrated Skills

Professor David Rothman, Queensborough Community College
Dr. Jilani Warsi, Queensborough Community College

While the movement toward integrating reading and writing curriculum is clearly happening across the country, there is still a tendency to teach reading and writing that is disengaged from meaningful academic content. This trend toward integration presents an opportunity for developmental educators to align their curriculum more closely with what is expected from students in 100-level content courses. We believe that students will be more academically prepared to meet the rigorous requirements of these content courses and will be more engaged in the learning process if they are exposed to real academic content while they are still in remediation.

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Pearson_LMU_coursedesign

Responding to the STC’s Nine Areas of Competency in Technical Communication

Professor Richard Johnson-Sheehan, Purdue University

In 2015, the Society for Technical Communicators (STC) launched their Certified Professional Technical Communicator program. Longtime members of this organization know that this kind of certification program is something we have wanted for years. Now, it’s a reality. The STC has chosen Technical Communication Today, 5e as the core text for the “Foundation” level certification. In this talk, Richard Johnson-Sheehan, author of Technical Communication Today, will discuss the “Nine Areas of Competency” that form the core of the STC’s certification program. He will discuss how Technical Communication Today responds to those nine areas now and how he expects the book to respond to them in the future.

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Pearson_LMU_coursedesign

The Gestalt of Revision

Dr. Bruce Ballenger, Boise State University

One of the threshold concepts of our field is the “centrality of revision to writing development.” Remarkably, revision is rarely studied or theorized. Even more troubling, there is some evidence that advanced writing students report they have little experience with rewriting their work, and admit that they lack confidence in their skills. What’s going on? This talk will share initial findings from a study that interviewed advanced undergraduate and graduate writing students on their feelings about revision and their current practices. It will also suggest new strategies for understanding and teaching revision, some of which draw on gestalt theory.

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